Poetry Challenge Week Four: Blackout Poems

 It’s week FOUR of the Weekly Poetry Challenge, and this week is all about blackout poems! A blackout poem is created by taking a block of text—like from a newspaper, magazine, or book—and “blacking out” everything except the words you want. Here’s a blackout poem I wrote: Created using the book MAKE BLACKOUT POETRY by John Carroll Read some black out poems! Here are some blackout poems by author Austin Kleon . Examples of student-created blackout poems . Check out this Pinterest board for more examples. Write a black out poem! When creating your blackout poem, you may to start with a pencil and circle or block around the words you want to keep for your poem. Then, once you’re happy with your poem use a sharpie to black out everything you don’t want. Blackout poetry is a great visual, but you can also type out your poem when you’re done to make it easier to read. Need a little help? Here’s a video by Austin Kleon on how he makes blackout poetry. If you or your kids write blackout poem

Ten Ways to Celebrate Poetry with Kids

Today we are happy to share a guest post by children's author Laura Sassi. Take it away, Laura!

Did you know April is National Poetry Month? Here are 10 ways to celebrate with your kids.

#1 Enjoy a poetry webzine for kids! Climb aboard an imaginary balloon, then enjoy some poems written for kids over at The Dirigible Balloon, a webzine that features poetry written especially for kids. There are even a couple of poems there by Read, Discuss, Do founder Rebecca J. Gomez! Check her poems out here:  https://dirigibleballoon.org/writer/rebecca-jgomez

#2 Participate in Poem in Your Pocket Day. Even littlest ones can enjoy the fun on April 18th, 2024 as people all over the nation carry favorite poems in their pockets to read and share throughout the day.  Teachers should ask parents ahead of time to help their little one select a short, simple poem to tuck into their pocket and bring to class. Throughout the morning, pause to read and celebrate each child’s poem. For more information check out the Academy of American Poets website. 

#3 Memorize a poem together.  I still remember the A.A. Milne poem “Disobedience” which my mother and I memorized when I was three. Actually, I’m not sure we even memorized it on purpose. I just wanted her to read it to me every night and pretty soon we were reciting it – just because we loved it so much. To hear it recited by Tom O’Bedlam, press here. (Link:  Is there a poem you and your child love? Then consider memorizing it together.  (If you’ve been reading it to them a lot lately, they may surprise you by already knowing it by heart.) Have fun!

#4 Have a Chalk-A-Bration. On the last day of this and every month, copy or create a poem in chalk with your child on a sidewalk, driveway, or playground surface for others to enjoy. For more details, visit kindergarten teacher and chalk poem lover, Besty Hubbard,at her blog I Think in Poems.

#5 Pen your own poems. Get a sneak peak at some poems written by the team here, then, encourage your kids to write their own poems using these Read, Discuss, Do author tips

#6 Hear your favorite children’s poets read their own work at No Water River. Poet Renee LaTulippe has a lovely video collection of authors reading samples of their poetry for kids. Each video segment is accompanied by an interview and extension activities. You can even find me reading my poem“Sir Ned”.  Enjoy! 

#7 Sip tea and listen to poems at a “Poetry Teatime”. Visit Brave Writer for tips on hosting a successful teatime with little ones. Though geared to a homeschool setting, her tips for teatime can easily be adapted to any family setting.  

#8 Take a field trip… to the library!  Poetry collections are shelved separately from fiction and picture books. Ask the librarian (or better yet let your child ask the librarian) to direct you to the poetry section. Then spend some delightful time exploring the wonderful breadth and diversity in children’s poetry books. Check out your favorites to bring home.

#9 Play with words. This is what poets do!  We play with sound and imagery.  Little ones love to do this too!  So, instill a love for poetry by playing rhyming games. Foster rhythm by stomping or clapping to to the beat of the words.  Play with onomatopoeia by creating your own sound words and acting them out.  Have fun with alliteration by taking turns making fun and crazy lists of words that begin with the same sound.

#10 Check out all the fun poetry-related Read, Discuss Dos we’ve shared right here.  Including this, and this, and this

Happy Celebrating!

Comments